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Odd and even squares

In2infinity - 4D Maths
In2infinity - 4D Maths
Odd and even squares
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Okay, this is a broadcast from Colin Power. Today we’re going to be re emphasising some of the stuff about squares and how they work odd number squares and even number squares. And these what I talked about before about the centre of infinity. Yeah, sort of through maybe I didn’t explain it very well, I don’t know. But uh, okay, let’s just, maybe we’ll can start with a sort of an idea, right? If we put ourselves and standing in the centre of a square, and let’s say we say, well, there’s a nice square of one and we stand right slap bang in the centre of that. Yeah. And let’s say now we we expand that square to be a square of two sides can be the same sized squares, right? But we’re in our square of one. Yeah, we’re just gonna see everything just from the perspective of our square one. And what we see when we look into our square when we say oh, look, square has been divided into four bits, and we are Wow, look at that. But we’re not seeing that the square is actually grown in size because it’s outside of our box. Okay. So there we always just stood in a square one. And what happens in the next instance is that the square will expand again as they expand to number three, which is an odd number. And suddenly you know, the grid has come into existence and the cross that was dividing our squares and he disappeared all across the cross, it just disappeared. You don’t want to just disappeared but you haven’t seen the expansion of the square that has caused that cross to disappear. But it’s really just because it’s just moved into an odd number. Now Yeah. So let’s keep standing at the centre of the box. And what we can see is as the square expands, whenever there’s an even number, it will create a cross in the middle of this one square that I’m stood in. And if it expands again, and becomes an odd number, the cross will disappear because they’ll be one square at the centre of that, of that square. And so we can use that concept. If you just imagine that there’s an infinite number of squares that are just expanding digital in all directions in the four directions, and it’s getting bigger and bigger and bigger. What I will experience from the centre of my square of one will just be a flashing from four to not being there to the Division of four to the one to the Division of four to the one to the Division of four to the one and that will carry on like that flashing flashing, flashing flashing flashing on into infinity for as long as the numbers and squares are expanding. And if it should stop at any, any point in the count, then it will either be an odd one or an even number. Yeah. And so I can understand whether it’s an odd number or an even number. If there’s a cross or if there’s a square. Now the point being here is if I superimpose an odd number with an even number, what I actually get is a square which is my real square. And actually now that square is divided into four as well we’ve come we combine those those numbers, we’ve flattened the odds and the evens together, and we’re actually left with now is another square but when you looked at it from the square plane expanding, there is a difference because now what happens is we’ve divided the whole plane outside of that one square as well, because we flattened the two types of squares into four yes and now the outer plane outside of my square one has now unified in its in its position as having a cross. Yeah, it’s no longer choosing cross where we’ve just flattened the two together. And so what if you think about now a diagonal line that runs through that we’re not taking one step up and then one step across in little boxes of one, because there we flattened it, so it’s now it becomes twice as dense infinitely, you zoom in, so you can go up a half step instead. Yeah, and across and digital. So that little diagonal line starts to start to flatten out. Yeah, and the more than I put that, say this division or on it’s either if I if I wanted to try and divide it more, but I can’t do anything more to the centre, can I? So you know, we can make the square as big as we like and the bigger we make the outer square, then that diagonal line will start to appear like a line in a diagonal, but actually, it’s not. It’s actually the balancing of that division of that one of that one square that sits at the centre. And so when I start to turn my attention to the centre of infinity, if I extend the square the square to infinity, let’s say what I’m actually looking at now from the from the perspective of where I am, we can take a let’s say, we just take a quarter square, for example. And what we look at, we make that square to say divided into nine. So now we’ve got the quarter arc from our zero squared in the square of nine and we’d like to use that because that’s quite nice for a lot of fourth dimensional mathematics. So we have the square of nine means that we can have an observer in the centre you see, like, that’s how it’s going to start. And as it expands to the 16 or yet, one. What happens is the observer, let’s say doesn’t move, but they just see these, the the, the, the square, dividing into four blah, blah, blah, yeah, and so now we can have four observer points, if you like, four squares of one, that sort of situated around the zero. And those become what they call the fractal points of the pie function. So that actually when we look at the infinite density, we can say that that’s the pie function itself. And that sort of sits in that little gap and we show that in the fractal that creates pie, which is the silver mean fractal and the route to fractal and the way they sit in that curvature in this in a star of eight, and that’s like creates a new kind of infinite density, but we’ll go through more of that in in due course. But that’s just to give you a little idea there about the nature of what he lies at the centre of infinity and think about it from the perspective of a square that you’re standing in. And understand that you’re you’re gonna see you won’t see the expansion of something or you won’t even know the sizes change because you don’t see change changing sizes, no space in 4d, but all you will see the flashing cross. And that’s all that happens. Yeah. And we call that squaring zero and and squaring it, you know, it’s, it’s a rotation of, of, you know, a number space. Yeah, there’s manifesting on the 2d plane. And you can imagine that the fourth dimensional plane is seeing from outside of that. So what we’re actually then looking at is the zero space, and we’re focusing on how that zero space operates. Which, which means that then we can see what’s happening in the other spaces around it. So that’s a and that leads us into things like Lipinski triangles, and other fractal geometries of that nature. Particularly the Pinsky square which isn’t particularly recognised, which you will find will be a square of nine. And the reason it’s a square of nine is because it doesn’t if you make it a square to nothing happens, you know, just makes a black blank page right? But what a lot of people don’t realise is is that whatever object you place in the centre of this Pinsky square will be reflected in the four directions exactly where the pie fractal exists. So there’s something there to be thinking about, you know, with the square root of two and if you think about how all of this works, and the Pinsky square, and check it out, check it out, spins the square of two. Yeah, just create a blank square with spin See, square with three creates a hole in the middle of that square, and you get the you have 3d fractals and all that stuff. Yeah. And that’s the fractals that you can see on the internet. So just to give you that linking in a bit of fractal geometry, we’re doing mathematics at the moment. We are going to be doing more on geometry. Soon when we talk about Mandelbrot set and the solution for all of that as to why does it look like it does when it shouldn’t look like it does. And that’s all to do with the number A and in then we’ll get a clearer picture of actually what infinite number space possibly could look like. Okay, that’s it for now. And any other questions Do feel free to ask and just remember we’re all standing in our box. Yeah. And all that’s happening is the cross is flashing beneath your feet. But you never see the expansion of timespace Oh, no. That’s the way it goes. Thank you very much for listening. My name is Colin Powell. This has been into infinity broadcast and we look forward to chatting again soon.

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Do the Math 60 + = 65