Liberal Arts


7 Liberal Arts

In ancient Greece, the 7 Liberal Arts were traditionally used to educate citizens to a level considered necessary to engage in the activities and laws of high society. They formulated this curriculum based on the two fundamental expressions of human consciousness. The Trivium, based on the word, and the Quadrivium based on number. The three components of the Trivium, Grammar, Rhetoric, and Logic were considered essential to the maintenance of law and order, while the Quadrivium, composed of the four interlocking disciplines, Geometry, Music, Cosmology and Pure Number, presented the mathematical and scientific study of the time.


The study of language, which deals with the structure and arrangement of words.

The expression of language to communicate a particular purpose.

The reasonable analysis of an argument assessed according to principles of validity.

The Trivium

Rule of Law is established on citizenship that can act and express itself through reason. Therefore, the Trivium establishes civilised society, just as is expressed today in our modern world, where we all recognise the importance of becoming literate.

The study of numbers in space with a compass and straight edge.

Harmony and resonance of sound expresses itself through numbers defined in time.

The analysis of planetary motion, considered as numbers in time-space.

The study of the quantity and quality of pure numbers.

The Quadrivium

Mathematics was the language through which the nature of Universal Laws could be understood, in the same way that Science today is based on formulas that are able to predict the future behaviour of natural phenomena.

Anselm of Canterbury
1033—1109
Saint Anselm was one of the most important Christian thinkers of the eleventh century. He is most
famous in philosophy for having discovered and articulated the so-called ontological argument that god must exist.

Leonardo da Vinci
1452 – 1519
Considered by many as a genius, the outstanding artist, engineer, scientist and inventor produced designs and ideas well ahead of his time, including, the helicopter, the parachute, the tank, an automatic cannon,
a spring based clock, the robot, a self propelling cart (car), and scuba gear to name just a few.

Johannes Kepler
1571-1630
The German mathematician and astronomer, Johannes Kepler, is a key figure of the 17th century scientific evolution. He discovered major laws of planetary motion, which provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton’s theory of gravitation. Much of Kepler’s enthusiasm stemmed from his theological convictions about the connection between the physical and the spiritual.

Thomas Jefferson
1743-1826
In 1776, american President Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence when he was only 33 years old. By then he could read in Greek and Latin, survey an estate, calculate an eclipse, dance a minuet, play the violin, practised law, break a horse, and design architectural structures that inherited many geometric principles of the ancient Greeks.

Nikola Tesla
1856 – 1943
The outstanding inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system. He also spoke eight languages, developed the underlying technology for wireless communication over long distances, and held approximately 300 patents.

Leonardo da Vinci
1452 – 1519
Considered by many as a genius, the outstanding artist, engineer, scientist and inventor produced designs and ideas well ahead of his time, including, the helicopter, the parachute, the tank, an automatic cannon,
a spring based clock, the robot, a self propelling cart (car), and scuba gear to name just a few.

Johannes Kepler
1571-1630
The German mathematician and astronomer, Johannes Kepler, is a key figure of the 17th century scientific evolution. He discovered major laws of planetary motion, which provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton’s theory of gravitation. Much of Kepler’s enthusiasm stemmed from his theological convictions about the connection between the physical and the spiritual.

Thomas Jefferson
1743-1826
In 1776, american President Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence when he was only 33 years old. By then he could read in Greek and Latin, survey an estate, calculate an eclipse, dance a minuet, play the violin, practised law, break a horse, and design architectural structures that inherited many geometric principles of the ancient Greeks.

Modern Education

The prominence of education in global society has grown substantially, leading to more diversity and choice than ever in human history. Whilst the fundamentals of reading, writing, and arithmetic still form the core, the overarching holistic structure of the Trivium and Quadrivium that unifies each arm has been shattered. However, in its original form, this is one of its most powerful aspects. For it provides a very well constructed toolkit, that helps organise the mind and explore the universe through both a logical and spiritual framework.

Trivium

Quadrivium