In2Infinity Logo

In2infinity Podcasts

64 bit calculations in 4D maths

In2infinity - 4D Maths
In2infinity - 4D Maths
64 bit calculations in 4D maths
/

Hi, it’s Colin Powell from into Infinity and welcome to another broadcast. This one, we’re going to be continuing from what we talked about last time about one to 32 in our atomic calculator and just explain a little bit about how that could work at our atomic computing level. Yes, geo quantum computing. So, we’ll notice that we sort of mentioned that there was the number 32, one to 32 for each calculation, and that’s what we were we got to last week. So hopefully some of you had a time to digest some of that. And so what you could say is whenever we perform a calculation, we normally take a another number to me and it’s to two numbers in, in and in our sort of system of quantum mathematics, the four dimensional mathematics that’s going to create another cross, a whole new cross we’re just going to duplicate the whole equation. And then we can decide whether we want to minus that equation times that equation, you know, times those numbers. And so if you think about it, what we have is we have the number 32. And we need another number 32, which makes 64. And 64 is a very nice bit size for our modern computer standards. And so what it means is each each 64 string can now become a quantum calculation. Yeah. And we can do that by just storing the the the necessary outputs or just yet that’s right, just for numbers. Yeah. And for those who are really interested, we noticed that you get a wonderful remember that on the timespace. We mentioned the wonderful time space. Just go back and look at some of that in our in our basic 40 calculator. You can see that when you put the one in a certain order it goes one and you get a four in the time. So really, we can just switch into those four. So we can take a switch and we can make four out of it. Yeah, we can switch it back and we can make one and when we switch into four you can say that’s an active cross. And when you switch into one you can say it’s not active cross. Yeah. So we have a way of turning on these crosses. If you like him from a simple bit switch, yeah, which could activate the calculation. Additionally, what we can say is, we can load a 32 bit in one side of the of the string, and we can put another bit in the other side of the string. And the calculation now became becomes contained within one string. And what that means is, is that we can take the two string harms, and we can perform plus minus divide and multiplication simultaneously. Yeah, that’s right. We just isn’t that you just get the 64 bit strings and you just make four of them. And you get your 32 times 32 results or 32 minus 32 results, which will be just a normally some sort of standard number that will be a degeneration code, if you like, and the plus will be a doubling code of whatever number it is. So you see what I mean. We’ve got these doubling functions, hashing functions, and they’re all going to be displayed simultaneously. We can map all those things simultaneously, just by storing 264 bit codes. Yeah. And you can imagine then the amount of data then we can store and just 264 bit codes, or 164 bit code 264 Because 364 464 bit codes, let’s imagine it like that. So we’ve got the calculation happening now, in the fourth math, more format types of mathematical l out algorithm. We can actually add another two and we could do this, add another one and we could do the square root function, which can be sort of handy sometimes actually quite handy, because square roots are another function of the diagonal. Yeah, they’re not. They’re, they’re, they’re a mathematical constant. And we can do things like you know, make pi pi as a sort of as a function like x times pi times y, and or divide pi, you know, so we can actually also set a numerical function to be the function that actually provides a qualitative analysis of the calculation, which we can you know, we could use any numbers for that as well. And we can try, we can then just switch those numbers very quickly get a different set of results, store those results, and build up a multi dimensional picture of what’s going on for that calculation. And so that allows us you can imagine, you know, normally when we’re performing calculations, we just get one answer. And here we’re going to get a well, quite a lot of answers, aren’t we? We’re going to get things that dissolve into infinity things that double things, half, you know what I mean? And so, we’re going to, we’re going to set the EFA value to 32. Because that’s all that we’re going to have is up to 32 calculations, isn’t it? And so we’ve also defined an effort value. And then we can put those effort values into a rhythm of time, let’s say you know, we start one at one effort value, and we move up or down every second or can be millisecond or whatever, your 1010 milliseconds, 100 milliseconds, whatever we wanted to set the time function and then you’ll create a wave and once again, you can project those onto into make a more dynamic number function. And when we will look at Dynamic number functions. The you know, the numbers start to become alive, they start to sort of throbbing blue or blue, blue and all that sort of stuff. So then we get to a far more advanced calculator. So that’s a little bit there more advanced quantum calculation, and how we perceive the atom then as a shape that shifting through time space, which is what it is, you know, and so when we find resonance points within that function, we can start to sort of say okay, maybe there’s a there’s a resonant point there. And we can just use the balancing of a shape to balance numbers, instead of taking guesswork as to where the electron might be. In fact, you don’t need to know where the electron might be. You just need to know the shape of the function that’s creating that, that that that anomaly in our space. And so you’re just catching it at a point in time, shall we say, and so we can we can get a pretty good estimate as to which which one through the time function by by setting these up as kind of oscillatory and you can imagine you can start to build something that you know can start to crush Schrodinger equations into like nanoparticles, you know, and just to give you the result you need without having to, you know, perform all of these, what should pretty much be incalculable, really, if you were to try and use it with standard mathematics, but in fourth dimensional mathematics because we’re looking at the degeneration of numbers into infinity. We can actually map those signatures, and those signatures can become shapes. Yes, that’s right. So that’s all for this week, I think. Put a few things in it. Oh, yeah. Let’s just one last thing, actually. So just when we’re timesing, this at times 32 and 30, we’re across. It’s worth noting that those are two crosses. Yep. And what you can do is you can place two crosses in a space in such a way that they they make a cube. Yeah. So imagine the corners become the corners of a cube. Yeah, this is you can you can arrange crosses in a couple of ways actually. But you can cross the zero point basically and you can create a three dimensional eight stepped across, and that would be zero squared plus zero squared. And when we come to zero squared plus zero squared, what we find is that we can compile those in sets of two. But if we compile them in sets of five that’s what we call the deal with reset because zero squared is actually what we call a d orbital. It’s actually one of those d orbitals. And that’s the other thing about the quantum calculator is that once you realise that, you have zero divided by two, which equals a p orbital, you have zero squared, which equals a d orbital, just just one of them and you have zero to the power of three, and that equals your F orbital, although there are the last two of the f orbitals are three dimensional, so three, 3d, three dimensional shapes so we can remove those ones from that. And so there’s a function here about five that comes quite handy in calculating complete sets of orbital shells. And you have to you have to sort of imagine we can you know when to get all of the calculations possible between those 32 And once we times and once we times that function by five sets, so we’re gonna have 3230 3232 in sets of five, we can start to map the, the d orbitals, and that becomes a set of 10, doesn’t it? Yeah, if you if you take a negative and a positive reciprocal, so that’s just that little bit of knowledge about all of that. Yeah. That how we can start to link fourth dimensional matrix mathematics into the orbital functions as we perceive them in the spdef model from science and as we do we will create a quantum calculator that will give us a fresh insights into how the atom is working and how the space around the atom is working at a very, very numerical basis. So that’s it for today and about how we up the quantum calculator to the next dimension, as it were, and all based on the one to 30 to remember that and that’s the electron count, isn’t it? Yeah. And so, yeah, so what we end up there with is some nice sort of stuff. We haven’t even talked about 03. But once again, you can do the similar sort of math, you just got to replace the x over y. Yeah, plus or minus x plus or minus y. And then next to it, you just write plus or minus z and you get the zero to the power of three and that will create a cross, which that plus or minus will then obviously ascend and descend of that centre line. That’s the octahedron. We call it in 3d in 2d in 3d space. Yes, right. 03 is an octahedron. We can learn about that about 2d to 3d. And when it turns into that when we deal in three dimensional space in we’re really just extending the plus or minus will just be an extension of that octahedral space and as it grows in number, so the square at its base will increase from square of one square for actually starts kind of square 40 Square for square of nine square of 16. so on, so on, so on. And so we end up working with the square function, which is defined then by the z function. And if you hold an octahedron in your hand, you can put it like north and south you can see where the square is at the base. And you can imagine it’s going up that pyramid, as you know, as it as we as we shrink it, it’s becoming half the size, you can see what I mean. It’s a shrinking and growing of an octahedron in space. Exciting stuff, because then we can have octahedral ratios and things like that. We can compare zeros to 31703 to another set of 03. When we do that with your calculations, and the d orbitals we go back to zero squared, and we compile them into fives. And then there’s a final one, which you might be thinking about, which is the f orbitals. Yet once again, you compile 03 into fives, and two sets of fives. And because of that function, what you get is you get a couple of extra orbitals, they’re called Star tetrahedral orbitals. And that’s because we’ll place two sets of zero squared to make those two sets up. So that’s the complete atomic structure for atomic calculation. And from that you should be able to get a pretty good idea about how the atom works. Without touching a single Schrodinger equation. Okay, thank you very much. We’ve just changed the number space there into atomic number space. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Using our atomic calculator and I’ve just described the, the workings of how that is so for those people who built an atomic calculator and have been enjoying the process. Now you have a new mission. Oh, yes to see if you can go properly into the atomic structure around the hydrogen atom. And if you want to find out more about that stuff, and a whole post section on our website called atomic geometry, you can go to atomic hyphen geometry.com or visit into infinity.com and find out more about some of our numerical theories of dimensional space based on geometry or theory of number, or four dimensional number space. So thank you very much for listening this week. My name is Colin Powell. You guys are awesome. And we’ll catch up with you again shortly. Have a great week.

Listen to more podcasts

Leave a comment

Do the Math 1 + 9 =